In loving reverence of the noble Tibetan Mastiff
~ Tuesday, June 11 ~
Permalink Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Dogs Sunset Lionbeardog Deep
30 notes
reblogged via lots-of-dogs
Permalink

dogsdogsdogsdogsdogs:

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

tibetan mastiff!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Dogs Lionbeardog Love the goldies so so much Big and fluffy
621 notes
reblogged via simpled0g
Permalink

allison1710:

“Let’s play but not too enthusiastically because I like lying here.”

These fucking cuties. 

Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Dogs BIG BIG DOGS Lionbeardog
52 notes
reblogged via allison1710
~ Saturday, May 11 ~
Permalink Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Dogs Lionbeardog
28 notes
reblogged via ti-m-e
Permalink

overlookingtibet:

From Wikipedia: The Tibetan Dog is a 2011 Chinese/Japanese animated film directed by Masayuki Kojima, co-produced by Madhouse and China Film Group Corporation. It premiered at 51st Annecy Film Festival in June 2011. In this film, a young boy named Tenzing leaves for Tibet after his mother passes away to live with his Father in the prairies and encounters a true friend in form of a golden Tibetan Mastiff.

I admit: I cried during The Tibetan Dog. It is an enjoyable film with beautiful animated depictions of Tibet, a unique cast of Tibetan characters, and a heart-warming friendship between a lost city boy and a wild dog.

Tenzin (subtitled as Tianjin in this youtube version; from here on out, the names in parenthesis will be those from this version) is a city boy who recently lost his mother and now must travel back to Tibet to be reunited with his father, Lhakpa (LaGeBa), who lives as a prairie doctor.

Tenzin’s parents met while studying medicine in the city but shortly after his birth, Tenzin went to live in the city with his mother while his father stayed behind in the prairie.

For Tenzin, life on the prairie, is not something he’s used to. He’s Tibetan, but his skin is visibly paler than those of the people he meets in Tibet, and he struggles with the food, the traditional chuba, and his new task as sheep-herder. He gets bullied by the local boys, including Norbu (Nuopu), the grandson of the local “medicine woman.”

Most narratives in mainstream society feature Tibetans as “backward” people who have never left their rural villages, but the reality is thousands of Tibetans have been forcibly relocated from their pastures and forbidden to continue their nomadic way of life. Two Tibetans meeting in the city while studying Western medicine, and then returning to Tibet with the intention of staying, is a narrative that you might actually find in the 21st century—many Tibetans that I’ve spoken to wish to use their exile as a springboard to knowledge that they can then share with their families and societies. They want to learn medicine, to be able to practice in their hometowns, or they want to become teachers so that they can return and educate future generations of Tibetans.

Tenzin’s mother returned to the city—the food and weather made her uncomfortable, which suggests that perhaps she was raised in the city. Tenzin’s father, on the other hand, seems quite comfortable living by himself in a tent.

Having Tenzin return to Tibet is a sparkle of hope. Perhaps one day, all Tibetans can return to their homeland, although for those who were born elsewhere, it might be uncomfortable for them at first. Tenzin, in a sense, can be seen as a stand-in for an exiled Tibetan, a Tibetan away who, in the middle of a  personal tragedy, finds himself in an alien homeland and now has to figure out who he is.

The film features a lot of lore surrounding Tibetans—the local “medicine woman” who is cheating local Tibetans out of paying prized gold coins for phony fixes for everything from hair loss to sad love lives, and there’s even a gang of Tibetan robbers who dash around on horses intimidating people.

I was suspicious about how the film was going to represent Tibetans, but I was pleasantly surprised. Sure, there are Tibetan robbers, but they are not portrayed as evil, heartless, or barbaric men. The “medicine woman” puts herself in a dangerous situation when it would have been easier to stay out of it. Even the two main female characters (not including Tenzin’s mother, who we only see in flashbacks) have moments when their actions help to drive the plot.

The main action of the film starts when Tenzin is out sheep-herding by himself for the first time. He nearly gets eaten by a bear when a golden Tibetan mastiff comes to his rescue. The mastiff is new to the prairie and the locals suspect that he is the cause of the animal and human deaths that started plaguing the prairie.

It’s jarring watching an anime featuring Tibetan characters speaking in Chinese. I don’t think there is a Tibetan version out there, but I hope there will be one eventually. There are so few representations of Tibetans in the media, and those that do exist are unrealistic, orientalist, and dated. This film offers a fresh perspective on Tibetan culture.

Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Tibet Free Tibet
15 notes
reblogged via otibet
~ Tuesday, May 7 ~
Permalink
beaverhayes:

Hates The Cone Of Shame

beaverhayes:

Hates The Cone Of Shame

Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi This displeases my noble Tibetan spirit Dogs
11 notes
reblogged via beaverhayes
Permalink
beaverhayes:

It won’t stop snowing.

beaverhayes:

It won’t stop snowing.

Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Dogs Lionbeardog Love the goldies so so much
20 notes
reblogged via beaverhayes
Permalink

naomasdarkside:

The Tibetan Dog (2011)

This is for anyone who really wants to watch it, this is the Full length movie. Since i know there are a lot of dog fans out there.


23 notes
reblogged via naomasdarkside
~ Monday, April 22 ~
Permalink
cosmicquestor48:

Tibetan MastiffThis is Tibetan Mastiff, They can grow up to 32 inches..The Tibetan Mastiff is considered a primitive breed. It typically retains the hardiness which would be required for it to survive in Tibet and the high-altitude Himalayan range, including the northern part of Nepal, India and Bhutan

cosmicquestor48:

Tibetan Mastiff
This is Tibetan Mastiff, They can grow up to 32 inches..

The Tibetan Mastiff is considered a primitive breed. It typically retains the hardiness which would be required for it to survive in Tibet and the high-altitude Himalayan range, including the northern part of Nepal, India and Bhutan

Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Tibet Free Tibet SO SO FLUFFY Lionbeardog Dogs BIG BIG DOGS
37 notes
reblogged via cosmicquestor48
Permalink

totororuru:

Tibetan Mastiff!

Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Lionbeardog SO SO FLUFFY so so naughty Dogs Don't fuck with this dog
183 notes
reblogged via millyyme
Permalink
beaverhayes:

Things on my dog.

beaverhayes:

Things on my dog.

Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do khyi Dogs Lionbeardog Love the goldies so so much Cute Fluffy
5 notes
reblogged via beaverhayes
Permalink
beaverhayes:

Pirate Tibetan Mastiff

beaverhayes:

Pirate Tibetan Mastiff

Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Lionbeardog Pirate Arrrrrrrrrrrrr Dogs
9 notes
reblogged via beaverhayes
~ Monday, April 1 ~
Permalink

deerheadlights:

Best friends forever!!

I cuddle Dorje like this every morning

Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Dogs Cuddles
16 notes
reblogged via deerheadlights
Permalink Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Lionbeardog Snowlion Dogs
47 notes
reblogged via bmrgould
Permalink Tags: Tibetan Mastiff Do Khyi Snowlion Free Tibet
46 notes
reblogged via blanketschocolate